iOS Developer Library

Developer

UIKit Framework Reference UINib Class Reference

Options
Deployment Target:

On This Page
Language:

UINib

Instances of the UINib class serve as object wrappers, or containers, for Interface Builder nib files. An UINib object caches the contents of a nib file in memory, ready for unarchiving and instantiation. When your application needs to instantiate the contents of the nib file it can do so without having to load the data from the nib file first, improving performance. The UINib object can automatically release this cached nib data to free up memory for your application under low-memory conditions, reloading that data the next time your application instantiates the nib. Your application should use UINib objects whenever it needs to repeatedly instantiate the same nib data. For example, if your table view uses a nib file to instantiate table view cells, caching the nib in a UINib object can provide a significant performance improvement.

When you create an UINib object using the contents of a nib file, the object loads the object graph in the referenced nib file, but it does not yet unarchive it. To unarchive all of the nib data and thus truly instantiate the nib your application calls the instantiateWithOwner:options: method on the UINib object. The steps that the UINib object follows to instantiate the nib’s object graph are described in detail in Resource Programming Guide.

Usage Special Considerations

To determine whether a class is available at runtime in a given iOS release, you typically check whether the class is nil. Unfortunately, this test is not cleanly accurate for UINib. While this class is new to iOS SDK 4, it was present but private, in previous releases. Special care needs to be taken when deploying code that uses the UINib class and also runs on iOS releases prior to version 4.

To determine at runtime whether you can use gesture recognizers in your application, test whether the class exists and, if it does, check to see whether th class responds to the selector nibWithNibName:bundle:. This method was not added to the class until iOS 3.2. The code might look like the following:

  • Class uinib = NSClassFromString(@"UINib");
  • if (uinib)
  • {
  • if (![uinib respondsToSelector:@selector(nibWithNibName:bundle:)])
  • uinib = nil;
  • }
  • if (uinib)
  • {
  • // use UINib class
  • }

Inheritance


Conforms To


Import Statement


Swift

import UIKit

Objective-C

@import UIKit;

Availability


Available in iOS 4.0 and later.
  • Returns an UINib object initialized to the nib file in the specified bundle.

    Declaration

    Swift

    init(nibName name: String, bundle bundleOrNil: NSBundle?) -> UINib

    Objective-C

    + (UINib *)nibWithNibName:(NSString *)name bundle:(NSBundle *)bundleOrNil

    Parameters

    name

    The name of the nib file, without any leading path information.

    bundleOrNil

    The bundle in which to search for the nib file. If you specify nil, this method looks for the nib file in the main bundle.

    Return Value

    The initialized UINib object or nil if there were errors during initialization or the nib file could not be located.

    Discussion

    The UINib object looks for the nib file in the bundle's language-specific project directories first, followed by the Resources directory.

    Import Statement

    Objective-C

    @import UIKit;

    Swift

    import UIKit

    Availability

    Available in iOS 4.0 and later.

  • Creates an UINib object from nib data stored in memory.

    Declaration

    Swift

    init(data data: NSData, bundle bundleOrNil: NSBundle?) -> UINib

    Objective-C

    + (UINib *)nibWithData:(NSData *)data bundle:(NSBundle *)bundleOrNil

    Parameters

    data

    A block of memory that contains nib data.

    bundleOrNil

    The bundle in which to search for resources referenced by the nib. If you specify nil, this method looks for the nib file in the main bundle.

    Return Value

    The initialized NSNib object or nil if there were errors during initialization.

    Discussion

    The UINib object looks for the nib file in the bundle's language-specific project directories first, followed by the Resources directory.

    The preferred mechanism for instantiating UINib objects is with the nibWithNibName:bundle: class method. A UINib object instantiated using the nibWithData:bundle: class method cannot release the cached data under low memory conditions. Your application should be prepared to release the UINib object and the data under low memory conditions, recreating both the next time the application needs to instantiate the nib.

    Import Statement

    Objective-C

    @import UIKit;

    Swift

    import UIKit

    Availability

    Available in iOS 4.0 and later.

  • Unarchives and instantiates the in-memory contents of the receiver’s nib file, creating a distinct object tree and set of top level objects.

    Declaration

    Swift

    func instantiateWithOwner(_ ownerOrNil: AnyObject?, options optionsOrNil: [NSObject : AnyObject]?) -> [AnyObject]

    Objective-C

    - (NSArray *)instantiateWithOwner:(id)ownerOrNil options:(NSDictionary *)optionsOrNil

    Parameters

    ownerOrNil

    The object to use as the owner of the nib file. If the nib file has an owner, you must specify a valid object for this parameter.

    optionsOrNil

    A dictionary containing the options to use when opening the nib file. For a list of available keys for this dictionary, see NSBundle UIKit Additions Reference.

    Return Value

    An autoreleased NSArray object containing the top-level objects from the nib file.

    Discussion

    You can use this method to instantiate the objects in a nib and provide them to your code. This method unarchives each object, initializes it, sets its properties to their configured values, and reestablishes any connections to other objects. For detailed information about the nib-loading process, see Resource Programming Guide.

    If the nib file contains any proxy objects beyond just the File’s Owner proxy object, you can specify the runtime replacement objects for those proxies using the options dictionary. In that dictionary, add the UINibExternalObjects key and set its value to a dictionary containing the names of any proxy objects (the keys) and the real objects to use in their place. The proxy object’s name is the string you assign to it in the Name field of the Interface Builder inspector window.

    Import Statement

    Objective-C

    @import UIKit;

    Swift

    import UIKit

    Availability

    Available in iOS 4.0 and later.