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raidutil(8)               BSD System Manager's Manual              raidutil(8)

NAME
     raidutil -- Manage, manipulate, and view RAID objects.

SYNOPSIS
     raidutil [global options] verb direct-object arguments ...

DESCRIPTION
     raidutil utilizes the CoreRAID framework to manipulate RAID devices.

GLOBAL OPTIONS
     There are several global options that may be used with raidutil. These options are not specific to any
     particular verb. Instead they have a global effect upon the way that raidutil performs.  These global
     options are:

     -c <ControllerType> | --controller <ControllerType>
              This option (controller) allows the user to specify a controller type.

     -h | --help
              This option (help) will print the standard "usage" text.

     -t | --terse
              This option (terse) will minimize superfluous text.

     -v | --verbose
              This option (verbose) will maximize the amount of detailed infomation the program will pro-vide. provide.
              vide.

     -V | --version
              This option (Version) will print out version information about this program.

VERBS, DIRECT OBJECTS, AND SPECIFIC ARGUMENTS
     acknowledge event -n <EventNumber>
              Marks an event as acknowledged by specifiying an identifying event number.  The -n may also be
              expressed as --number.

     create raidset -n <NewRAIDSet> -d <ListOfDriveBays> -r <RaidLevel>
              Create a RAIDSet specifiying: a RAIDSet name; a list of drive bays; the RAID level.  The -n,
              -d, and -r flags may also be expressed as --name, --drives, and --raidlevel, respectively.
              Valid raidlevel's are J+, 0, 1, 5, 0+1.

     create volume -n <NewVolumeName> -r <NameOfRAIDSet> -s <SizeOfVolume>
              Create a volume specifiying: a volume name; a RAIDSet to build the volume on; the size of the
              volume.  The -n, -d, and -s flags may also be expressed as --name, --raidset, and --size,
              respectively.

     delete raidset -n <NameOfRAIDSet> [-f] [-u]
              Remove a RAIDSet.  The name of the RAIDSet is specified using the -n argument.  The -n flag
              may also be expressed as --name.  The optional -f flag may also be expressed as --force.  The
              optional -u flag may also be expressed as --unmount.

     delete volume -n <NameOfVolume> [-r <RAIDSet>] [-f] [-u]
              Remove a volume.  The name of the volume is specified using the -n argument.  The -n flag may
              also be expressed as --name.  The optional -r flag may also be expressed as --raidset.  The
              optional -f flag may also be expressed as --force.  The optional -u flag may also be expressed
              as --unmount.

     list [devices]
              List all known RAID devices.  This is the default behavior if no direct object is specified.

     list status
              Prints an overview of status information for the targeted RAID device.

     list driveinfo
              Lists relevant information about any disk drives associated with the targeted RAID device.

     list eventinfo [-c n]
              Lists the last 100 event messages.  When provided, the optional 'count' argument, will limit
              the output to the last 'n' event messages (a value of 0 will display all event messsages).

     list raidsetinfo
              Lists relevant information about any RAIDSet associated with the targeted RAID device.

     list taskinfo
              Lists relevant information about any tasks associated with the targeted RAID device.

     list volumeinfo
              Lists relevant information about any volumes associated with the targeted RAID device.

     list versioninfo
              List version information about the targeted RAID device.

     modify controller [arguments listed below]
              This will allow the user to modify specific attributes of the targeted controller.
              --writeCacheBattery
              --WriteCacheEnable

     modify drive [arguments listed below]
              This will allow the user to modify specific attributes of the targeted drive.
              --addglobalspare -d <DriveBayNumber> [-Y | -N]
              --removeglobalspare -d <DriveBayNumber>
              --addlocalspare -d <DriveBayNumber> -r <RAIDSet> [-Y | -N]
              --removelocalspare -d <DriveBayNumber>
              --adopt -d <DriveBayNumber>

     modify raidset [arguments listed below]
              This will allow the user to modify specific attributes of the targeted RAIDSet.
              --addcapacity -n <RAIDSet> -d <ListOfDrives> [-Y | -N] [-W]
              --addmirror -n <RAIDSet> -d <ListOfDrives> [-Y | -N] [-W]
              --migratetoraid5 -n <RAIDSet> -d <ListOfDrives> [-Y | -N] [-W]
              --verify -n <RAIDSet> -p <ServicePriority> [-W]

     modify volume [arguments listed below]
              This will allow the user to modify specific attributes of the targeted volume.
              --expand -n <VolumeName> [-r <RAIDSet>] -s <SizeToAdd> [-W]
              --move -n <ListOfVolumes> -r <SourceRAIDSet> -t <TargetRAIDSet> [-W]
              --rewrite -n <VolumeName>  [-r <RAIDSet>] -p <ServicePriority> [-W]
              --verify -n <VolumeName>  [-r <RAIDSet>] -p <ServicePriority> [-W]

              NOTE: Valid values for <ServicePriority> are:  low, medium, high.

EXAMPLES
     raidutil create raidset -n set2 -d 1,2 -r J+
              This creates a RAIDSet named "set2", using the drives in bays one and two, with a raid level
              of "Enhanced JBOD."

     raidutil create volume -n volume1 -r set1 -s 1.5T
              This creates a volume named "volume1", on the RAIDSet named "set1".  The size of the volume
              will be 1.5 tebibytes.

     raidutil modify volume -n volume1 --move -r set1 -t set2 --waitfortask
              This moves the volume named "volume1", from the RAIDSet named "set1".  to the  RAIDSet named
              "set2".  The program will wait for the verification task to complete before proceeding.

     raidutil delete raidset -n setX
              This deletes a RAIDSet named "setX." Any volumes associated with this RAIDSet will also be
              destroyed.

     raidutil delete raidset -n setX --force
              Regardless of whether there are any mounted file systems associated with this group, this com-mand command
              mand deletes a RAIDSet named "setX." Any volumes associated with this group will also be
              destroyed.

     raidutil delete volume -n myVolume
              This deletes a volume named "myVolume."

     raidutil delete volume -n myVolume -r BigRAIDSet
              This specifically deletes a volume named "myVolume," that exists on the RAIDSet named BigRAID-Set. BigRAIDSet.
              Set.

     raidutil delete volume -n myVolume:BigRAIDSet
              This specifically deletes a volume named "myVolume," that exists on the group named BigRAID-Set. BigRAIDSet.
              Set.  Make note that this example uses a method of overloading the volume name with the group
              name in order to specify the group.

     raidutil list devices
              This will print out a list of all known RAID devices.

     raidutil list version
              This will print out version information for the RAID device.

COMPATIBILITY
   RAID Levels
     When creating a RAID set the user must specify the type of RAID set that they wish to create through
     the raidlevel argument.  Valid RAID levels are as follows:

           J+   Enhanced JBOD

           0    RAID 0 (striping)

           1    RAID 1 (mirroring)

           0+1 RAID 0+1 (mirroring a striped pair)

           5    RAID 5 (striping with distributed parity)

     Using Enhanced JBOD, you can create a RAID set using a single drive. The resulting RAID set doesn~t
     gain the performance or data protection of the other RAID levels, but it does benefit from the data
     caching and battery backup provided by the RAID card. An enhanced JBOD set can also be migrated to
     other RAID sets or moved to another computer that has a Mac Pro or Xserve RAID Card installed.

     RAID 0 offers improved performance but no data protection. Blocks of data are spread across all of the
     drives in the RAID set in a process called striping. This allows better performance because file con-tents contents
     tents move in parallel to and from the individual drives in the set. RAID 0 also provides the most
     usable disk space; nearly all space on all drives is available for user data. You can create a RAID 0
     set using two, three, or four disks.

     RAID 1 protects data against a drive failure and allows some increase in read performance. Data is pro-tected protected
     tected by duplicating the contents of each drive on a second drive in the set, a process called mirror-ing. mirroring.
     ing. Because of the duplication, a volume based on a RAID 1 can~t be larger than half of the total
     space available on the drives in the set. You can create a RAID 1 set using either two or four disks.

     RAID 0+1 combines the performance of RAID 0 with the data protection of RAID 1 by mirroring a striped
     set on a second pair of drives. Because mirroring duplicates all data, this level offers less usable
     disk space than RAID 5. Usable space is half of the total space available on the drives in the set. You
     need four disks to create a RAID 0+1 set.

     RAID 5 is a compromise between the performance of RAID 0 and the data protection of RAID 1. Performance
     is improved by striping data across the drives in the set. Data protection is provided by parity infor-mation information
     mation that is distributed across the drives. Data can be recovered if any single drive fails. RAID 5
     leaves you with more usable space than RAID 1. RAID 5 needs only the equivalent of one drive~s worth of
     disk space to store the parity information. You can create a RAID 5 set using either three or four
     disks.

   Specifying volumes
     When performing certain actions, it may be desirable to explicitly specify the group that a volume is
     built upon.  For example, when removing a volume, one might want to specify the associated group for
     clarity.  In these cases, an optional argument is generally available for this purpose.  An example of
     this is:

           # raidutil delete volume -n myVolume -r theBigRAIDSet

     A shortcut exists whereby the RAIDSet may be specified as a suffix to the volume name.  For example,
     this is equivelent to the previous command:

           # raidutil delete volume -n myVolume:theBigRAIDSet

     The RAIDSet name is simply added to the volume name using the colon character as a separator.  This
     shortcut is supported by all of the "modify volume" actions.

   Specifying Sizes
     When specifying data that indicates a numeric size, the value will be assumed to be expressed in
     megabytes (MB) unless otherwise indicated.

     For our purposes, we will treat all size units as 1000 based numbers.

     Values may be expressed in bytes by ending the value with the letter "B".

     Other units for measure storage space follow suit, as shown by the following table:

           kilobyte (KB) 2^10 = 1000 bytes
           megabyte (MB) 2^20 = 1000 * 1000 bytes
           gigabyte (GB) 2^30 = 1000 * 1000 * 1000 bytes
           terabyte (TB) 2^40 = 1000 * 1000 * 1000 * 1000 bytes
           petabyte (PB) 2^50 = 1000 * 1000 * 1000 * 1000 * 1000 bytes

     For the purposes of entering size information to this program, the default units are mebibytes (MiB).
     This program will support values expressed in the following units.  Acceptable abbreviations are listed
     after the name:

           one byte = 1B         ---  B
           kilobyte = 1000B      ---  K, KB
           megabyte = 1000K      ---  M, MB
           gigabyte = 1000M      ---  G, GB
           terabyte = 1000G      ---  T, TB
           petabyte = 1000T      ---  P, PB

     For example, each of the following commands will all create a volume named "theVolume" with a size of
     600 megabytes, on the RAIDSet named "RAIDSet":

           # raidutil create volume -n theVolume -s 600000K -r RAIDSet-A

           # raidutil create volume -n theVolume -s 600 -r RAIDSet

           # raidutil create volume -n theVolume -s 600M -r RAIDSet

           # raidutil create volume -n theVolume -s 0.6GB -r RAIDSet

           # raidutil create volume -n theVolume -s 0.0006TB -r RAIDSet

           # raidutil create volume -n theVolume -s 0.0000006P -r RAIDSet

   Special Size Values For Creating Volumes
     In place of a numeric value, the user may provide the word all.  When this is done the program will
     attempt to use the maximum valid value.  For example, the following command would create a  volume
     named "BigVolume", on the RAIDSet named "BigRAIDSet", using all available space on that RAIDSet:

           # raidutil create volume -n BigVolume -s all -r BigRAIDSet

     Similarly, the user may provide a value that indicates a percentage of available space.  This is done
     by providing a numeric value between 1 and 100 that is followed by the `%' character.  For example, the
     following command would create a  volume named "BigVolume", on the RAIDSet named "BigRAIDSet", using
     all available space on that RAIDSet:

           # raidutil create volume -n BigVolume -s 100% -r BigRAIDSet

     The following command would create a  volume named "MyVolume", on the RAIDSet named "MyRAIDSet", using
     one fifth of all available space on that RAIDSet:

           # raidutil create volume -n MyVolume -s 20% -r MyRAIDSet

     It should be noted that, all percentage values are rounded down to the nearest whole number.  Thus,
     33.333% becomes 33%, and 17.9321% becomes 17%.  Computed values are based on the RAIDSet available
     capacity attribute.

     NOTE:  The use of mebibyte and related units is strongly endorsed by IEC, IEEE and CIPM.  The mebibyte
     and related units are defined in the IEC document IEC 6__27-1.

EXIT STATUS
     The raidutil utility exits 0 on success, and >0 if an error occurs.

SEE ALSO
     diskutil(8), hdid(8), hdiutil(1), ufs.util(8), msdos.util(8), hfs.util(8), drutil(1),
     diskarbitrationd(8)

Mac OS                          March 16, 2007                          Mac OS

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