What is a "radar?"

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Ouoting from the 'net, rather than linking, since moderation to allow seems hit/miss"


"Apple's Radar system is also open to registered developers who can use it to file bugs or enhancement requests with Apple. Although Radar is reputedly very good when used inside of Apple, this is not generally apparent to users outside of the company. The frequent request to "file a radar" often sounds more or less like "forget it, buddy", because issues frequently go weeks or even years without so much as an acknowledgement or indeed any indication at all that anyone has even read the issue. This leads to the perception of the Radar system as being something of a black hole.


External users have no way to know if an issue has been reported, so it's common to file an issue and then be informed that it's a duplicate of a previous issue. That seems reasonable at first, but in practice it means that you'll never get notified if the issue is resolved."


And yes, it's the same as 'Report Bugs'

RADAR


Apple's RADAR system is the centralized spot whereby Apple Engineers, Testers, Beta Testers, and others can officially log bugs pertaining to various Apple software and devices.

RADAR has been rebranded as 'Feedback Assistant' which is automatically installed anytime you'll install a beta OS on your devices.

In fact, only up until recently Apple's Radar site was still accessible via radar.apple.com now appears to finally be offline.

So in summary, Radar is now branded as so:


...
Radar was also the name of the app Apple engineers used internally as well as the bug database. So it was an overloaded term.

So bugreport.apple.com was an external way to report into radar, it just didn't have a full view of a bug.

(Source: was a bug screener at Apple for several years and lived in the Radar app all day.)

These days, they now have a better front end for it, I understand.
Bug tracking system

>Radar is about interpreting


The bug reporter works the same way...use of a tool to gather information, where it's interpreted and acted on as applies.


Ever heard the expression "it's on our radar..." ...? That phrase went into the public vernacular a long time ago and usually means "we're looking into it, -or- we're working on it...". In the context of the bug reporter, I think it's simply insider slang. I like it better than 'file a bug', tho 😉 - great way to find out if you're talking to an actual developer, too.

Yes, but why "Radar"?

Radar is about interpreting radio waves reflected off aircraft, ships, land, rain, etc.

Actually, when people talk about 'Radar', they can also mean https://openradar.appspot.com, which is an public open bug database. When reporting a bug on bugreport.apple.com, you are encouraged to also copy it to openradar, so that other people can actually see what bugs have been reported.

Thank you both for clearing this up for me.


By the way, KMT, I gave you the points because you've got fewer of them.

Yes, but the Bug Reporter tool is only the one public facing side of a more intricate collection hub - including vast amounts of data sent to it automatically by Macs running developer previews for example (unless you turn that off in System Preferences > Privacy). It has it's own ecosystem inside Apple but, yes, as far as we're concerned filing a radar is filing a bug.

You didn't answer my question. My question is, "is it the same thing as the Bug Reporter tool?"

Radar is Apple's bug tracking system. It's developed in-house for use at Apple exclusively, and it tracks absolutely everything, from bugs to tasks to enhancements to features to problems with content to issues with IT, and anything else you can think of.


Apple's Radar system is also open to registered developers who can use it to file bugs or enhancement requests with Apple. External users have no way to know if an issue has been reported, so it's common to file an issue and then be informed that it's a duplicate of a previous issue.